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HistoryEedit

Egyptian hieroglyph ꜥ Phoenician
Yodh
Etruscan
I
Greek
Iota
 
     

In Semitic, the letter mey hae originatit in a hieroglyph for an airm that representit a voiced pharyngeal fricative (/ʕ/) in Egyptian, but wis reassigned tae /j/ (as in Inglis "yes") bi Semites, acause thair wird for "airm" began wi that soond. This letter coud an aa be uised tae represent /i/, the close front unrounded vowel, mainly in foreign wirds.

The Greeks adoptit a fairm o this Phoenician yodh as thair letter iota (⟨Ι, ι⟩) tae represent /i/, the same as in the Auld Italic alphabet. In Latin (as in Modren Greek), it wis an aa uised tae represent /j/ an this uise persists in the leids that descendit frae Latin. The modren letter 'j' wis firstly a variation o 'i', an baith wur uised interchyngeably for baith the vowel an the consonant, comin tae be differentiated anly in the 16t century. The dot ower the lawercase 'i' is whiles cried a tittle. In the Turkish alphabet, dotted an dotless I are considered separate letters, representin a front an back vowel, respectively, an baith hae uppercase ('I', 'İ') an lawercase ('ı', 'i') fairms.

In modren Inglis, 'i' represents different soonds, aither a "lang" diphthong /aɪ/ as in kite, which developed frae Middlin Inglis /iː/ efter the Great Vowel Shift o the 15t century, or the "short" /ɪ/ as in bill.

UisageEedit

The letter 'I' is the fift maist common letter in the Inglis leid. It is an aa uised in mathematics tae denote the imaginary unit  

Computin codesEedit

Character I i
Unicode name LATIN CAIPITAL LETTER I     LATIN SMAA LETTER I
Encodins decimal hex decimal hex
Unicode 73 U+0049 105 U+0069
UTF-8 73 49 105 69
Numeric chairacter reference I I i i
EBCDIC faimily 201 C9 137 89
ASCII 1 73 49 105 69
1 An aa for encodings based on ASCII, includin the DOS, Windows, ISO-8859 an Macintosh faimilies o encodins.

Ither representationsEedit

See an aaEedit

Relatit letters an ither similar charactersEedit

ReferencesEedit

  1. Brown & Kiddle (1870) The institutes of English grammar, p. 19.
    Ies is the plural of the English name of the letter; the plural of the letter itself is rendered I's, Is, i's, or is.

Freemit airtinsEedit