Khmer (ភាសាខ្មែរ), or Cambodian, is the leid o the Khmer fowk an the offeecial leid o Cambodie. It is the seicont maist widely spaken Austroasiatic leid (efter Vietnamese), wi speakers in the tens o millions. Khmer haes been considerably influenced bi Sanskrit an Pali, inspecially in the ryal an releegious registers, throuch the vehicles o Hinduism an Buddhism. It is the earliest recordit an earliest written leid o the Mon-Khmer faimily an aa, predatin Mon an, bi a significant margin, Vietnamese. As a result o geographic proximity, the Khmer leid haes influenced, and an aa been influenced bi; Thai, Lao, Vietnamese an Cham mony o whilk aw form a pseudo-sprachbund in peninsular Southeast Asia, syne maist conteen heich levels o Sanskrit an Pali influences.[5]

Khmer
Cambodian
ភាសាខ្មែរ
PronunciationIPA: [pʰiə.ˈsaː kʰmae]
Native taeCambodie, Vietnam, Thailand
EthnicityKhmer, Northren Khmer, Khmer Krom
Native speakers
16 million (2007)[1]
Early forms
Dialects
Khmer script (abugida)
Khmer Braille
Offeecial status
Offeecial leid in
 Cambodie
 ASEAN[2]
Recognised minority
leid in
Regulatit biRyal Academy o Cambodie
Leid codes
ISO 639-1km – Central Khmer
ISO 639-2khm – Central Khmer
ISO 639-3Either:
khm – Khmer
kxm – Northren Khmer
Glottologkhme1253  Khmeric[3]
cent1989  Central Khmer[4]
Linguasphere46-FBA-a
Se asia lang map.png
  Khmer

Khmer haes its awn script, an abugida kent in Khmer as Aksar Khmer. Khmer differs frae neighborin leids lik Thai, Lao an Vietnamese in that it isna a tonal leid.

ReferencesEedit

  1. Mikael Parkvall, "Världens 100 största språk 2007" (The World's 100 Largest Languages in 2007), in Nationalencyklopedin
  2. "Languages of ASEAN". Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  3. Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Khmeric". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
  4. Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Central Khmer". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
  5. David A. Smyth, Judith Margaret Jacob (1993). Cambodian Linguistics, Literature and History: Collected Articles. Routledge (UK). p. 44. ISBN 0728602180.